Celebiography.net

John Balliol

Picture of John Balliol

Age: 63

Citizenship: United Kingdom

Background

His brothers died childless, and he inherited the land Balliol in England and France in 1278 and joined them Galloway in 1290. In the same year, when the heir to the Scottish throne, Margaret, Maid of Norway, died Balliol became one of 13 contenders for the crown. He immediately declared himself the heir to the throne of Scotland, presenting a clear justification of their claims, as his mother was the daughter of Margaret, the eldest daughter of David, Earl of Huntingdon (Huntingdon), brother of King Malcolm IV and William I the Lion. His main rival was Robert Bruce (grandfather of King Robert I the Bruce).

The English King Edward I was Scottish barony in Norheme (Norham) Northumberland (Northumberland) and insisted on the fact that as a mediator between the contenders, he must be recognized as overlord of Scotland. His court of 104 assessors discussed the competitors claim more than a year, but a clear statement of Balliol primogeniture ultimately prevailed. Edward I confirmed the decision of 17 November 1292, and Balliol was enthroned at Scone on November 30 arrived with a vassal to visit Eduardo in Newcastle on December 26.

John, however, soon showed disobedience. When in June 1294 Edward demanded military aid from Scotland for his planned war in Gascony, the Scottish reaction was the conclusion of agreements on mutual assistance with France. When Edward I sent an army to Gascony in January 1296 sovershilinabeg Scots northern England. Edward reacted quickly: he took the castle of Berwick (Berwick) on 30 March. The castle surrendered after a siege of the King of England, and Montrose (Montrose) John Edward handed his kingdom. He was unarmed and behaved honorably and with dignity at the ceremony, for which he later received the nickname "Toom Tabard". John was imprisoned in the Tower of London until July 1299, when the result of re-intervention of the Pope, he was released. After that, he poured-sown in Normandy